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Elm Analytics - Automotive Supply Chain Risk Digest #118 - May 10 - 16, 2019

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Automotive Supply Chain Risk Digest

May 17 · Issue #118 · View online
Weekly highlights of the events that impact supply chain risk within the automotive industry.

HUMAN CAPITAL
Ford is planning to cut up to 550 non-manufacturing jobs in Britain as part of its restructuring plan for Europe. 
INDUSTRY DIRECTIONS
Canadian supplier Multimatic is planning a $7.8m “first of its kind” driving simulation and vehicle development center in Novi, Michigan. The new center will create 50 jobs and will develop technology for hybrid and electric vehicles.
LITIGATION
Ford is recalling over 270,00 vehicles in North America over a rollaway risk. The recall covers 2013-2016 Ford Fusions equipped with the base 2.5L inline-four engine and the 2019 Ranger.
MERGERS, VENTURES, ACQUISITIONS
Inteva has sold its sunroof and panel systems subsidiary to Spain’s CIE Automotive SA.
ZF has acquired German computer vision technology company Simi.
Röchling Automotive is selling its door panel production plant in Wolfsburg-Hattorf, Germany, to Kasai Kogyo Co.
Hyundai and its sister company Kia are investing $80m into Croatian electric supercar maker Rimac. Together, the three automakers will develop two new high-performance EVs.
Michelin will buy telematics company Masternaut to expand fleet services and solutions.
The UK Government has announced an additional investment of $31.2m into a new EV battery factory being built in Britain. The UK previously announced an initial investment of $89.4m into the project.
PLANT CLOSING
Honda has confirmed the 2021 closure of its Swindon factory in the UK. 
A bulletin posted by Unifor Local 222 revealed vehicle end of production dates for two lines at Oshawa Assembly Plant. It also lays out a schedule for reaching “unallocated” status.
PLANT DISASTER
Tesla settled its first personal injury lawsuit to come to trial, paying a former janitor $13m. Four years ago another employee crushed her legs in a plant accident, leaving her permanently disabled.
PLANT OPENING
Japanese plastic parts supplier DaikyoNishikawa is investing $110m into a new plant in Huntsville, Alabama. The plant will employ approximately 380 people and supply parts to the upcoming Mazda Toyota Manufacturing assembly plant.
Hyundai opened a new engine cylinder head machining plant in Montgomery, Alabama this week. The $388m facility will support the production of more than 650,000 engines per year.
Volkswagen is investing $1.1b into building its EV battery factory in Germany. The move comes amid concern the automaker has over the supply from outside battery vendors.
PRODUCTION DECREASE
Nissan is cutting US production after weak earnings.
REGULATION
WSJ: China’s auto market is waiting for the government to apply policies to try to turn around the declining market.
The Senate’s Energy and Natural Resources Committee held a hearing on a bill that would streamline regulation and permitting requirements for the development of mines for lithium, graphite, and other EV materials. The legislation is an attempt to catch up to China in the mining of raw materials for EV batteries.
The FCC is reportedly planning a vote in June over launching a review of the currently unused 5.9Ghz band that has been reserved for automakers since 1999. Opening the band would allow automakers to boost the use of Wi-Fi in vehicles.
With only a day left before deciding whether to impose new tariffs on the EU cars and parts, President Trump is reportedly expected to delay action for as many as six months. According to the Commerce Dept., auto imports from Europe totaled $56.4b last year.
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